Bridges Class – to start in June

Two Books Retreats will work with Nancy Macgregor to present the Bridges class again.  It will be a six week class on Mondays starting in June.  We will select new locations along the Yahara River in Madison.  Details to follow soon.

Taking a class

I’ve been taking a class with Nancy Macgregor on “a bold approach” to watercolor.   We have worked on a few assignments.  Some has been fun, some frustrating, but all of it an adventure into the worlds of color and composition.  Below are some photos.  The students will be hanging an exhibit at the Madison Christian Community on Old Sauk Road in Madison  – this is a unique location where two congregations share a building.  I will be joining the fun as the amatuerist of amateurs.

Week Four – Willy Street Bridge

We will be at the convergence of the Yahara River and Willy Street, where there are actually two bridges, the auto bridge and a rail road bridge converted to bike and pedestrian use.  We are close to Bethany Church, and there is a fun story there.  The train for years went by the church and over the RR bridges just as the pastor was finishing up the message each and every week.

Bridges Class Week Three

We dodged the rain again and tried out the idea of sketching with a brush.  The East Washington bridge is very modern looking so this was a different look.  Our text for discussion and thought was Psalm 19. It turned out that the previous Psalm was in the lectionary the following Sunday.  No, that was not planned.

First Bridges Class – May 17

They started with a deluge ,followed by cold and breezy conditions.  Nevertheless, all the students came and with pluck and grace, met each other, took a look at Psalm 1 and went off to paint the Stone Bridge at the Sherman Avenue end of Tenney Park.

Yahara River Sketch

This is a pen and watercolor sketch of the Yahara River between Lake Monona and Lake Mendota.  I went for a walk one day to count all the bridges.  In fact I missed on in the lagoon at Tenney Park, which is on the North end of the stretch.  Lots of human and natrue interaction.  There is a tradition in some art forms to put in a mistake to reflect human inperfection.  That seems to come naturally to this author!

Bridges over the Yahara
Bridges over the Yahara